A series of digital objects for long-distance relationships [#Remote]

daniel sher’s objects strengthen long distance relationships
“sher, along with ben hagin, has developed ‘saying things that can’t be said’, a series of objects that revolve around people in long-distance relationships. the first pair, which is called ‘I’m with you’ transmits heart beats across space. as a person holds the object in the palms of their hands and places it upon their chest, the sphere on the receiving end of the message begins to flutter, indicating that they are thinking of their significant other.” via DesignBoom

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Demo of autonomous helicopter delivering autonomous ground vehicle for mission [#Robots]

Robotic vehicles team up on first fully autonomous mission demonstration
“The demonstration at Fort Benning involved a K-MAX helicopter, which in 2011 became the first unmanned aircraft system to deliver cargo in-theater when it made its first combat resupply mission to the US Marine Corp in Afghanistan. This time, the aircraft delivered an SMSS by sling load as part of a scenario where soldiers were defending a village. The SMSS, which has also seen deployment in Afghanistan, is the largest unmanned vehicle to have been deployed with US ground forces and is designed for unmanned ground transport and support for light, early entry and special operations forces.” via Gizmag

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Census data used to show how Americans have migrated between states [#Visualization]

US Domestic Migration Charted as Ordered Stacked Area Graphs – information aesthetics
“The interactive infographic Where We Came From, State by State [nytimes.com] by Gregor Aisch, Robert Gebeloff and Kevin Quely reveals how US citizens have moved between different US states since the year 1900. The migration data is based on Census data, which was used to compare the state of residence versus the state of birth of a representative sample of Census forms.” via Information Aesthetics

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Noke is a keyless lock in the form of a simple padlock [#Security]

Noke Is A Simple, Keyless Bluetooth Padlock To Share Access To Your Stuff
“But Noke — which is not yet in the market but launched a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign this week — is aiming to be a simple and therefore multipurpose connected padlock. Rather than focus on a single niche, it’s offering keyless entry to your garage or shed or yard or ladder or gym locker. Or indeed your bike. Wherever or whatever you would normally stick a padlock on to keep secure.” via TechCrunch

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Using taxi trip data to create a visitors guide to popular places in Stockholm [#Maps]

Stockholm tourist guide is based on the city’s most popular taxi trips
“Created by Taxi Stockholm, the platform uses GPS data from the 8 million trips the company’s fleet make around the city each year. Taxi Trails maps all of these journeys to show where customers — made up of a mix of locals and other tourists — actually travel to. Using heat maps, users can quickly see the most popular places in the city and can organize them by trips made in the last year or month, in the daytime or nighttime, on a weekday or weekend, or even by posh or hip customers (based on an assumption that passengers from the upmarket region of Östermalm are posh, while those from Södermalm are hip).” via Springwise

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Installation uses motion-sensitive acrylic pipes to create interactive space [#Installation]

Breaking the Surface – Responsive ‘ocean’ of acrylic actuators
“The installation draws inspiration from how the company’s geologists and geophysicist’s look at the world below sea level through detailed reconstructions of sub-surface landscapes created from seismic imaging and drill samples. An abstract representation of this landscape is created from a matrix of 529 acrylic pipes piercing the ceiling between the first and the second floor, creating organic rock-like formations on the first floor reflected as an ocean surface on the second. Visitors are invited to interact with the installation by moving around in the space underneath it. The pipes that normally hang down to about an height of 1.3 meters above ground will be lifted up to create a protective dome around each person underneath the installation. The inverse effect of people’s movement creates wave like motions on the top floor.” via Creative Applications

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Remotely visiting a museum after closing using robots [#Robots]

Robots Take Over London’s Tate Britain After Dark
“From August 13th to 17th, four camera-equipped robots had free rein of the museum by night. Every few minutes the robots selected new operators from an online queuing system to drive them around the darkened gallery. People could control their movements using on-screen buttons or arrow keys, making them turn around, move forward and look up or down. People could also follow their journeys through an online portal and find out more about the art works on-screen from live commentary by art experts.” via PSFK

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DSTRUX lets users set timers for access to their shared stuff [#Files]

DSTRUX Brings Self-Destructing Files To iOS
DSTRUX wants to give users more control over the files they share. It’s a web platform, which launched in April, that lets users set a self-destruct timer for automatically encrypted pictures or documents they want to share through email or Facebook. DSTRUX, which was released as a free iOS app today, also allows users to give permission for a friend to share the item, but lets the user see where exactly the item is being forwarded. If the user does not like where or who the item is going to, they can terminate access to everyone.” via TechCrunch

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Piezoelectric coating could power phones through sounds around you [#Power]

The Sounds Around You Could Soon Charge Your Phone’s Battery
New collaborative research by Queen Mary University of London and Nokia shows that the piezoelectric zinc oxide—which creates a voltage as it expands and contracts—can be used to create coatings that could help power portable devices. The scientists have a developed a nano-rod form of zinc oxide, which can be applied to the surface of other materials. Those nanorods respond to everyday noise, microscopically expanding and contracting and in turn creating a voltage. That can be captured by electrical contacts on either side of the rods and could be used, in theory, to charge a phone or some other portable device.” via Gizmodo

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City sleeping patterns based on Jawbone Up sensor data [#Wearables]

How Cities Sleep, Visualized
“Those in metropolitan areas like New York have a regimented regime: up early on weekdays, little activity during the working week, out late Friday and Saturday, sleeping in on the weekend, and mid-week evening workouts. Compare that to Orlando, and the difference is incredible—there, there’s little distinction between days at all. Make of that what you will.” via Gizmodo

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Interesting new social and technological trends culled from the web by Richard Banks.