RFID for testing architecture

U.K. family agrees to RFID monitoring. For science, of course.. “A British family has agreed to have their activities monitored via RFID tags while they occupy a new smart home, in order to provide data to the builder, which will use the info to make future home-building decisions. As family members move from room to room, 26 sensors will track their locations, giving the builder a better idea of whether, say, anyone is actually using the hot tub or playing table tennis in the garage.”

Engadget

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Live TV online

BBC TV channels to be put on net. “The BBC’s TV channels will be made available on the internet, BBC Director General Mark Thompson has confirmed. He announced plans for the MyBBCPlayer – which will allow viewers to legally download seven days of programmes [...]. A simulcast of BBC One or BBC Two, letting UK viewers see programmes on the web at the same time as they go out on TV, is also planned as part of MyBBCPlayer . “

BBC NEWS

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Finding travelling companions

Booking A Flight Companion. “Peter Shankman has created a system that allows travellers to book the person they’d like to sit next to. He says, “I’ve created match.com meets expedia meets friendster. You register at AirTroductions, and create a profile. Enter in your photo, and various facts about you, depending on whether you’re looking for a business connection or a personal connection or both. Once that’s done, the next time you fly, you enter your itinerary at the site, and AirTroductions shows you who else has registered for your flight, as well.””

PSFK

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GPS in cellphones

Roamin’ Holiday. “Imagine leaving your car at home and networking with other GPS-phone users to form impromptu car pools, or receiving Web pages on your phone about Pickett’s ill-fated charge as you amble up Seminary Ridge in Gettysburg. Geo-aware devices that trigger location-specific services will become as natural as the very idea of wirelessness, and the Web itself will cease to be a placeless cyberspace and will be pinned at millions of points to the physical world we inhabit. “

Tech Review

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Cellphone growth in Africa

Cellphones Catapult Rural Africa to 21st Century. “On this dry mountaintop, 36-year-old Bekowe Skhakhane does even the simplest tasks the hard way. Fetching water from the river takes four hours a day. To cook, she gathers sticks and musters a fire. Light comes from candles. But when Ms. Skhakhane wants to talk to her husband, who works in a steel factory 250 miles away in Johannesburg, she does what many in more developed regions do: she takes out her mobile phone.”

New York Times

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Perceptual differences between cultures

People raised in Asia perceive more detail than those raised in the USA. “A study that tracked eye motions of subject shown photographs concluded that people raised in Asia took in more detail in the background and more information about the relationship between the foreground and background objects than did people raised in America, who focused largely on foreground objects. The researchers claim that this is the result of a more cooperative culture in Asia that is driven by higher population density and historical communal modes of production (shared irrigation systems for rice paddies), while western culture is more individualized. “
Boing Boing

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Middleware game creation tools

Unity game engine adds Windows support. “Well, we support anything that makes developing games easier, because that’s going to ultimately mean more diverse games that break the stultifying parade of sequels that plague the industry. There are thousands of guys (and maybe dozens of girls) out there right now that have always dreamed of making a game but have been put off by the ever-escalating costs of doing so.”

Joystiq

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Legitimate music sharing

Downloading Disrupted. “PlayLouder have signed a deal with Sony-BMG, one of the biggest record companies in the world, that will allow PlayLouder members to download music and then share it with their peers. The PlayLouder software analyses the sharing and works out what songs are being shared and how frequently. They then pay a fee based on this to the record label that owns the songs rights.
This business model is truly revolutionary. It allows users to continue file sharing and actively encourage this whilst satisfying the record labels by compensating them based on actual figures. “

PSFK

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