Wi-fi to encourage public transport use

San Francisco Bay Area Bus-Fi scheme to dish out free, mobile internet. ‘The service will be free for riders (and freeloading WiFi addicts in following cars), and is due for a full rollout in mid-fall. The bus routes taking part in the test phase travel along three of the longest bridges in the area (the Dumbarton, San Meteo and Bay), which is intentional: having WiFi on longer routes makes it easier for passengers to justify getting out and booting up their laptop.’

Engadget

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Easy geo-tagging

Flickr Geo Tagging Now Live. ‘Adding location information on Flickr is done through the Organizr, under the Organize tab. In addition to the “Your Sets” and “Your Groups” tabs in that area, they will add a Maps tab where you can drag photos into a Yahoo Map area. A marker will appear that shows the number of photos included with that marker. Once you have a location you can use the Organizr to search your photos and then drag them individually or by sets into the map.’

Techcrunch

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Seamless multi-mon

Radius 320 Seamless Display: Look Ma, No Borders. ‘These blokes from Oxford claim to have optically erased those distracting borders between displays by using a specially-designed lens wedged between each panel. It doesn’t require any special drivers, but you’ll need a couple of video cards with a total of three DVI outputs with 1600×1200 resolution to get this baby going. ‘

Gizmodo

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Perpetual motion myths?

The men who can produce limitless amounts of clean, free energy. “In Steorn’s theory, fixed magnets could act upon a moving magnet in such a way as to make it a virtual perpetual motion generator. In an electrical appliance – a computer, kettle, mobile phone or toy – that would provide all the power for its lifetime. Of course, free-energy cars, power plants and water-pumping systems could follow. A better world indeed.”
Guardian Unlimited

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Bigger flexible displays

LG Phillips E-book: Flexible Means Flexibility. “Besides 14.1 inches taking the crown as the largest E-paper display yet, it’s completely flexible (though, maybe sticking the prototypes in hard cases isn’t the best way to highlight this feature). The 300ms response time is still pretty far from displaying video, but any content needing a constant refresh will nullify the main power benefits of e-paper anyway.”

Gizmodo

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook