Testing makeup

Japanese department stores trialing virtual makeover machines. ‘Sure, we’ve seen hypothetical approaches before, but this rendition lacks the mess and time requirements of previous methods by allowing customers to snap an image of their face, and then scan electronic tags of interesting looking makeup in order to dash their on-screen persona with whatever they please. The system allows the user to test endless combinations of products without causing a mess, using up samples, or demanding extra help, and the “before and after” feature should do a number on same-store sales.’

Engadget

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Mini projectors

Explay’s nanoprojector gets a little face time. ‘Explay’s unit utilizes “a combination of laser and LED light sources,” otherwise known as an Advanced Spatial Light Modulator (ASLM), and in the time they had to view it in action, there were quite impressed. They noted the relatively low 320 x 240 resolution, but were satisfied with the image quality from one to two feet away, and praised its ability to remain in focus regardless of distance from the screen.’

Engadget

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Copyright apathy

Americans think downloading no big deal. ‘Only 40 percent of Americans polled by Toronto-based Solutions Research Group agreed that downloading copyrighted movies on the Internet was a “very serious offense.” That compares with the 78 percent who said shoplifting a DVD from the local video store was a very serious offense.’

Reuters.com

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

personal aroma

Researchers catch a whiff of “aroma fingerprints”. ‘The team has uncovered that each human has at least 44 chemical compounds in their odors that can be distinguished, and aside from assisting in identification, can be used in forensic studies to determine true causes behind crimes, deaths, or other misdemeanors. It’s even stated that this new technique can assist officials in learning about one’s “gender, lifestyle, whether or not they smoke, recent meals, and stress levels.”‘

Engadget

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook