Interactive menus

New York Hotel Bar Uncorks an Interactive Wine List
“Pull up a stool at the goatskin-upholstered wine bote, tap the glowing word wines projected in front of you, and the list scrolls into view. Choose a type and a bottle — hand and finger movements reveal its details (grape, origin, tasting notes, cost). The info unfolds with an animated flourish out of a flower icon; think Minority Report meets Sideways. Behind the alcohol-enabling magic is a lot of technology: Cameras and object-recognition software track your hand gestures — and ignore stuff like glassware — following the motion with a trail of projected white pixel dust.”
image 
Wired

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Gel sensors

Gel changing color in a second
“MIT researchers have developed gels which can change colors almost instantaneously when they’re exposed to a variety of stimuli, such as temperature, pressure or humidity. These gels could be used to design inexpensive sensors. For example, these gel-based sensors could be useful in a food processing plant to ‘indicate whether food that must remain dry has been overly exposed to humidity.’ Now the researchers are working on a gel which would change color in response of electricity.”
image 
Primidi

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Digital wardrobe

Ultra-premium wardrobe storage and valet service
“Garde Robe is a first-class, full-service wardrobe storage facility that not only provides a place to stow pieces that currently are out of rotation, but digitally photographs each item to be organized in an online Cyber Closet. Customers can browse a catalogue of their belongings at their leisure from anywhere they access the web and arrange for delivery as needed.”
image
Springwise newsletter

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Smile evaluation

Rating Facial Expressions
“Omron’s smile-measurement software picks up the hallmarks of a smile–such as narrowed eyes, an open mouth, creases around the mouth, and wrinkles turning downward around the eyes–and uses an algorithm to assess the extent of the smile and rate it on a percentage scale. The analysis is performed in real time and only takes about 44 milliseconds using a Pentium 4 3.2-gigahertz PC, Seddon says. The smile software works on images of faces as small as 60 pixels wide.”
image
Technology Review

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

GPS for the slopes

Satski: First Real Time Interactive GPS Piste Map For Skiers
“Using the Satski, you can create an interactive piste map that can be used to guide, track , and record your movements on the slopes. You can even upload your routes to Google Earth and share them with others. The Satski can also help you find the best slopes for your skill level and help you improve by recording your average and max speeds, distance traveled, and altitude information.”
image 
Gizmodo

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Cable management

Clever Cable Organizers
“The picket fence on the left have an adhesive on the back that sticks to the base board – creating a trench between the fence and wall where nasty cords can be stashed away. The wrap around design on the right is even more straight forward – keep cords from bunching up on the floor by wrapping any slack around the two pronged electrical mount. Simple.”
image 
PSFK

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Switching viewing angles

NEC works up LCD with switchable viewing angles
“the firm has developed an LCD “that can switch between wide and narrow viewing angles without impairing image quality.” This ability enables viewers to narrow the 140-degree viewing angle down to 30-degrees so that any plans to sneak a peek at what you’re glancing at are immediately subverted. Furthermore, NEC’s technology is said to differ from other alternatives by “not causing image quality to deteriorate,” as it relies on a function of the rear plate (as opposed to the panel’s front plate) to handle the switcheroo.”
image 
Engadget

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook