Micro-content

Blippr Is Twitter For Micro-Reviews
“The micro-review site will forward your Blipps to Twitter, Facebook, and FriendFeed (although the fact that it allows 20 characters more than Twitter means that overly-lengthy reviews will be shortened when they are translated into Tweets). In keeping with SMS culture, the four ratings are emoticons: =D, =), =|, or =(. Like Twitter, you can follow what your friends are Blipping, and update your “media status” of what you are reading, watching, playing, or listening to. “
image 
TechCrunch

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Unique books

Faber Finds generative book covers
“a book is only printed when someone orders it – and, thanks to some clever gener­ative programming by Universal Everything collaborator Karsten Schmidt (undertaken through his own studio, postspectacular.com), each cover printed promises to be totally unique. Various decorative elements designed by Marian Bantjes are arranged by the programme into a decorative border around the book’s title and author.”
image
CR Blog

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Video adventures

Choose Your Own Adventure, Youtube Style
“Youtube’s video response feature is a perfect set-up for homemade choose your own adventure storytelling. The popular book series allows its readers to determine how stories will end by directing them to specific pages depending on which next step (they’re given multiple options) they want to take the characters on. Youtube user SMPfilms’ video series is similar, allowing the viewer to make the next move in the story (in this case, finding the main character’s cat) by choosing one of the video responses featured on the first clip’s page.”
image 
PSFK

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Predict The Future On WashingtonPost.com

Predict The Future On WashingtonPost.com
“Predictify, which launched in 2007, goes beyond basic polling systems by integrating discussion features and monitoring a users’ accuracy score across the entire service. While there isn’t currently a way to weight one question more than another, the site’s algorithm does take into account the type of question and the accuracy rate of participants. Besides the Washington Post, Predictify is also found on The New York Times and San Francisco Chronicle’s sites. To offer an incentive for users to take part in the polls, the site has also implemented a premium program that allows companies to sponsor a poll and reward the most accurate participants with cash.”
image 
TechCrunch

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Detecting emotions

FuChat Concept Phone Detects Then Displays your Emotional State
“The FuChat concept phone is pretty, and kind of half-phone, half-Chumby as its surface is a concealed display used to show widgets: from weather displays, to showing a “keep out” sign on your door. But the emotional-sensing aspect got me intrigued. FuChat would be able to analyze your voice and body temp and guess at your emotional status… then display it back to you, supposedly enhancing the emotional aspects of communication.”
image 
Gizmodo

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Comparison shopping

Italians dial up best food price
“Thanks to a short message service (SMS) text system set up jointly by the Italian agriculture ministry and consumer associations, shoppers can check the average price of different foods in northern, central and southern Italy. With prices spiralling out of control in some parts of the world, some people feel that it is high time consumers could check just how much traders are profiting.”
image
BBC NEWS

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Online reading

Literacy Debate – Online, R U Really Reading?
“As teenagers’ scores on standardized reading tests have declined or stagnated, some argue that the hours spent prowling the Internet are the enemy of reading — diminishing literacy, wrecking attention spans and destroying a precious common culture that exists only through the reading of books. But others say the Internet has created a new kind of reading, one that schools and society should not discount. The Web inspires a teenager like Nadia, who might otherwise spend most of her leisure time watching television, to read and write.”
image 
NYTimes.com

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook