Drawing emotions

emotionally vague survey results
"a collection of mainly graphical results from a research project that focused on revealing how people feel anger, joy, fear, sadness & love. a simple survey asked 250 participants between the ages of 6 & 75 years from 35 different countries to graphically represent these emotions on a set of human silhouettes. the resulting drawings were compiled in layered Photoshop documents. in addition, participants could express emotions textually or choose appropriate colors."
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information aesthetics

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Bandwidth mapping

Invisible Journeys: Mapping the Connections Around Us
"The picture above is a data visualization of the wireless access she picked up on a 45 minute car ride from a village to a city. 451 wireless nodes were recorded, with the red circles representing those with WEP encryption, the blue = WPA encryption, and the yellow = no encryption. Interesting to see the shifting levels of security and access moving from small town (non-existent) to big city (ubiquitous)."
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PSFK

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Online music play

JamLegend Takes On Guitar Hero On The Web (1,000 Invites)
"Once you sign up, you pick a song from a variety of genres (although right now there are only songs in rock, alternative, and acoustic) and a difficulty level. Once the song starts playing, notes come down as dots on a guitar fret, and you have to press the right buttons on your keyboard and “enter” as they pass by. You can play “Jam Style,” holding your keyboard like an air guitar, or “chill style” (see illustration.). I’d recommend chill style—you never know who might walk into the room and catch you geek rocking with your keyboard. The game will will also support game guitars plugged into our computer for serious faux fretters."
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TechCrunch

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Braille overlay

The Visual Assistance Card by Kyle Lechtenberg
"The card lays on top of the debit/credit card reader and through the use of Braille imprinted on the card, the user is able to keep their personal information private thus increasing their independence while shopping in any store. The Visual Assistance Card is light weight and can be easily stored out of the way until future use. Definitely designed for usability – a must in today’s world."
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Yanko Design

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Virtual reality product development

Miele CAVE -VR design for around the home
"CAVE technology lets products appear in a virtual worldhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_world before they exist in reality, thus enabling a number of different doctrines and technologies to be integrated much faster and the process of development and innovation accelerated in speed and quality. Product developers, designers and engineers can see the end result before it is crafted with real atomshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atom , enabling them to discuss and refine the end result without much effort and cost. The speed gained by avoiding errors in communication between the design modalities enables more experimention in a shorter time-frame and more importantly, a better end result."
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Gizmag

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Dashboard displays

Cars: Is this the Futuremark 3D OpenGL-Powered Car Dashboard of the Future?
"We’ve seen all-digital concept dashboards before, but none seem as impressive 3D (or close to reality) as Futuremark’s. It scraps everything behind and to the right of the wheel in favor of a smooth, uninterrupted display onto which an OpenGL powered 3D engine renders everything you might need—instrumentation, navigation, entertainment system controls, climate controls, everything."
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Gizmodo

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Small PCs

Space Cube, the tiny PC that looks great next to an apple
"PC Pro’s ProBlog has turned up a tiny PC that really is tiny: about 2 inches square. It’s running Linux on a 300MHz processor, and has plenty of ports. The story says:Most intriguing, though, is the Space Wire port. It may sound like a mere science fiction fantasy, but this incredibly thin socket is a crucial part of the Space Cube’s armoury. That’s because it’s a type of proprietary interface use by the ESA, NASA and JAXA when the Cube actually goes into space."
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guardian.co.uk

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