Tongue Control

Tongue Control
“The tongue stimulator consists of a thin-film array of 144 electrodes–it’s a bit larger than a quarter–that sits on the surface of the tongue. A stimulator delivers electrical signals based on visual information–in this case, the movement of a dot on a computer screen. “It acts like a low-resolution monitor with a 12-by-12 array of pixels,” says Williams. A similar device is already in use for people with balance disorders–tongue stimulation tells the user whether her head is upright–and is also being tested as a visual aid for the blind.”
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Technology Review

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In-air wi-fi

On Virgin America’s inaugural GoGo WiFi flight: this post published from 35,000 feet
“GoGo has a built-in traffic shaper that keeps an eye out for those using more traffic than others. If you’re consuming too much, it’ll scale you back (although no one has a hard cap). If you’re the only one on GoGo (say, on a red-eye at 4am) then you can go crazy, you won’t be scaled back. Still, I’m sitting next to my old pal Brian Lam from Giz, and I’d wager the two of us are somehow taking up about 80% of the plane’s bandwidth.”
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Engadget

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Online consultations

The Doctor Will See You Now — Online
“Patients who are members of the health plan pay a co-pay, just like at the doctor’s office. Doctors hold 10-minute appointments, which can be extended for an optional fee, and can file prescriptions through the system. Uninsured patients can also use it, for a fee that the health plans choose but which will be less than $50, much less than a visit to the emergency room, which is where the uninsured often end up. Health plans pay American Well a license fee per member to use the software, as well as a transaction fee of about $2 a patient each time a patient sees a doctor. Doctors, meanwhile, pick up a few extra dollars on the side. They get paid less than an office visit but more than a phone consult and do not have to worry about scheduling, overhead and paperwork. They just log on and wait for patients to come to them. American Well files all the claims, and the money is deposited into the doctor’s bank account.”
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NYTimes.com

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3D camera

Fujifilm’s 3D camera gets the hands-on treatment
“Unlike other tech we’ve seen that does 3D in one shot, this one sports a pair of lenses and sensors to capture light in stereo, while on the back a 2.8-inch LCD alternates between the two images at 60 fps to give an apparently convincing 3D effect. Better, though, should be the 8.4-inch 3D photo frame under development, and Fuji’s Frontier photo labs are also being upgraded to produce lenticular prints (the sort you can tilt left and right to see different things) that are said be “really good.””
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Engadget

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Phone service API

Twilio: Powerful API For Phone Services That Can Recreate GrandCentral’s Core Functionality In 15 Lines Of Code
“The startup has developed a simple API with pay-as-you-go pricing that allows developers to quickly implement phone services into their applications, opening the door to a number of services that were previously only accessible to the small sliver of engineers trained in the dark magic of phone calls. [...] Lawson says that Twilio is looking to commoditize these phone services by making them much more accessible to developers, by introducing a set of very intuitive commands. The API primarily consists of 5 commonly used phone actions (Say, Play, Record, Dial, and Gather a phone number), each of which behaves exactly as you’d expect it to.”
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TechCrunch

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Photo shopping

SnapTell Explorer Instantly Looks Up Any Product via Photograph
“Similar to a bar code scanner (except you photograph the item cover, not its bar code), SnapTell automatically looks up your item and gives you links to Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Wikipedia, and straight-up search engines so you can compare prices and find out more about it. SnapTell’s results aren’t 100% accurate—once it gave me a strategy guide result when I photographed a video game cover—but everything else I tried it on, the results were spot-on.”
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LifeHacker

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