Mapping the internet backbone

2009 Global Internet Map
“TeleGeography’s new Global Internet Map draws upon their annual Global Internet Geography research to provide a unique view of the world’s Internet backbone architecture. The map’s global projection traces the intercontinental links between the countries of Europe, Asia, North and Latin America, and Africa. Regional close-ups provide insight into key routes within each region. Nine accompanying figures and tables present valuable data on Internet bandwidth by country, regional and global Internet capacity growth, backbone providers, traffic by application, wholesale pricing, and broadband user growth.”
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visualcomplexity.com

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Split screen

One screen, two images
“Remember lenticular printing, where two different images were printed on a single piece of striated plastic? You could tilt the plastic to one side for a sort of ghetto animation effect. [...] Mercedes Benz will be incorporating a more high-tech version of that, called Splitview, in their car dashboards. [...] The idea is that the driver can look at maps while the passenger watches something else. For just driving around it sounds like overkill to us, but we wish this tech had existed when we were children; with only one TV, What To Watch was the ultimate and epic sibling battleground.”
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Core77

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Car biometrics

Prototype Scanner Gives Middle Finger To Drunk Driving
“The device combines an identification security system with fingerprint testing. A driver places his middle finger inside a scanning box which analyzes the grooves of the fingerprint, as well as the chemical properties of the skin (such as oils or sweat). Within twenty seconds, the board reveals whether the driver’s condition is suitable to drive. If the blood-alcohol level is above the legal limit, the engine will lock up. The gadget also serves as a theft prevention device. The finger print scanner has a database of people allowed to drive the car, so no one can break in and take it for a ride, even if they’re sober.”
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Wired.com

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Self tracking

Quantifying myself
“As[...] I track myself – 40 things about my body, mind, and activity – every day. The fact that I do this tracking seems to interest people. [...] I found two interesting trends or patterns in my data, one of which surprised me. The first trend was that my mood went up significantly on days that I did more exercise. My highest mood days were during Tai Chi workshop weekends, when I did 5-6 hours of Tai Chi each day. The second, more surprising one for me was that on days when my mood was down, I ate a lot more – up to 3,170 calories one day instead of my usual average of about 2,050! This suggested to me that I use eating to process emotional upsets, which I always knew subconsciously but had never been forced to face.”
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The Quantified Self

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Designing soft toys

Plushie: An interactive design system for plush toys – stuff animals
“We use a sketching interface for 3D modeling and also provide various editing operations tailored for plush toy design. Internally, the system constructs a 2D cloth pattern in such a way that the simulation result matches the user’s input stroke. Our goal is to show that relatively simple algorithms can provide fast, satisfactory results to the user whereas the pursuit of optimal layout and simulation accuracy lies outside this paper’s scope. We successfully demonstrated that non-professional users could design plush toys or balloon easily using Plushie.”
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MAKE

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Wide-angled cameras

Scallop Imaging wide-angle security cams look to the sea for inspiration
“Boston’s own Scallop Imaging, a Tenebraex subsidiary that has developed a “low-cost” security camera that sees 180 degrees of view without fisheye distortion or the lag present in pan-and-tilt alternatives. Additionally, the multi-eyed cam automatically stitches and downsamples images, and can capture a new 7-megapixel still to transmit over Ethernet “every second or two.” It’s small enough to be placed into a light socket-sized hole, and it’s powered by the same Ethernet cable that links it into a building’s surveillance system.”
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Engadget

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Tracking objects

Keeping Tabs on Tools
“Tool Link’s core technology is an RFID reader built into the truck bed that reads microchips on the tools to sense which ones the bed contains. Each microchip, or RFID tag, is fitted with an antenna so that data can be sent between the reader and the tag. In this case, the reader might request the number of the tool from each tag contained in the truck bed. The RFID reader provides all the power in the transaction, meaning that the tags on the tools don’t need any sort of battery supply. Similar RFID systems are used by many large companies for inventory purposes. What makes Tool Link unique is the application and ThingMagic’s focus on embedding RFID into the object. The antennas, for example, are manufactured to look like the rest of the truck bed so that they can blend in seamlessly. In the future, Maguire says, the truck bed itself might be the antenna.”
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Technology Review

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