Multitouch pads

A Better, Cheaper Multitouch Interface
“It consists of two plastic sheets, about 8 inches by 10 inches, each with parallel lines of electrodes, spaced a quarter inch apart. The sheets are arranged so that the electrodes cross, creating a grid; each intersection is essentially a pressure sensor. Crucially, both sheets are covered with a layer of force sensitive resistor (FSR) ink, a type of ink that has microscopic bumps on its surface. When something coated in the ink is pressed, the bumps move together and touch, conducting electricity. “The harder you press, the more it conducts,” says Rosenberg.”
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Technology Review

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Augmented reality storybooks

A true augmented reality experience?
“The video shows a photobook like any other. It doesn’t contain strange symbols with extreme contrast, but is realistic. When holding it in front of a camera magic seems to happen. I really like the simplicity of the graphics used. It’s not 3D, but kept simple… making it a nice experience. A great detail about this video is the camera. Notice how it is combined with a desk lamp, making it natural for people to aim at the part you are reading. This way you don’t have to hold up the book in front of the camera anymore. Really nie.”
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Johnny Holland

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Dedicated timelapse cameras in your environment

Timelapse Garden Video Camera Watches Your Garden Grow So You Don’t Have to
“The Timelapse Garden Video Camera (henceforth TGVC) is a weatherproof digital camera that’ll take interval photos and combine them into a neat 1280×1024 video file presumably via some custom software. The intervals can be anywhere from every five seconds to every 24 hours, and can shoot objects as close as 20 inches away or as far as a 54-inch wide view. It comes with a removable 2GB of storage and the battery will last for up to 4 months while taking a picture per hour. It costs $159.99, which is awfully cheap considering you’ll pay about the same for a half-decent point-and-shoot that’ll explode upon the first morning dew.”
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Gizmodo

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Billboard control

Japanese Cellphones Control This Giant Billboard Video Game
“Nikkei has a post about Toshiba’s new Digital Billboard in Tokyo’s Akihabara district, where passerbys can dial up a number and connect to an interactive game which is displayed on the giant sign. Cellphone gamers square off against other players connected through Toshiba’s Youtube channel. The number keys are used to control a paintbrush, and the goal is to cover squares on the grid in paint while searching for the Toshiba mascot. ”
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Gizmodo

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Mapping the trivial

smalltalk
“As the weather change registers across the social sphere, so does its visibility to people who might not have witnessed the weather itself. However, the weather has the ability to ‘go viral’ in a sense, and create second and third-hand musings on the weather change. Thus what might start as one person’s disdain for the sprinkles on the hood of his car, becomes a torrential downpour as that singular comment ripples through the interlaced network of status messages. If enough ‘social weather’ data is aggregated it can be used to form a multi-dimensional picture of the weather and the effect is has on our lives. However, the triviality of the small talk and the topic of broadcast is what makes social weather mapping so interesting. We found this beautiful and hilarious at the same time.”
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Chrome Experiments

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Easy genealogy

Online Project in UK Could Expand Your Family Tree
“The wide variety of sources include parish registers, wills, land deeds and school records, painting a comprehensive portrait of daily life in London that dates back nearly 400 years. Beyond its sheer scope – this will be the biggest collection of documents in the UK outside of the National Archives – what makes this venture especially significant is the fact it will enable millions of people to trace their roots back further than ever before. The Telegraph explains: Because of London’s size in comparison to other cities before the industrial revolution, the organisers believe that as many as 50 per cent of the British population will be able to find ancestors in the collection, as will an estimated 135 million people in the United States, Canada and Australia.”
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PSFK.com

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Customised thrills

Using Bio-Feedback to Customise Amusement Park Rides
“The team is studying how the physiological data correlates with the emotions a person reports experiencing during a ride. Knowing how to tell when a person is having fun, bored or fearing for their life could make it possible to have rides automatically alter their behaviour to give the best possible experience. For example, the individual cars of a roller coaster could each deliver a ride customised to the occupants.”
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PSFK.com

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Tracking objects

If Objects Could Talk They’d Say, “SendMeHome.”
“The site is wacky but brilliant. It lets you register any object with a unique code, which is printed out on a small sticker that you place on the object. The object can be anything from your wallet or iPhone to a beloved frying pan. […] The lost-and-found feature is the only practical reason you would use the service. But once you’ve attached a sticker to a favorite object and registered it on the site, there are other things you can do with it. You can tell a story about the object, pass it around, or put it on a mission. It is on its way to becoming a spime,. These spimes are “always associated with a story. . . . they are protagonists of a documented process,” as Sterling once described it.
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TechCrunch

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