Printable organs

Printing body parts: Making a bit of me
“Dr Atala’s process starts by taking a tiny sample of tissue from the patient’s own bladder (so that the organ that is grown from it will not be rejected by his immune system). From this he extracts precursor cells that can go on to form the muscle on the outside of the bladder and the specialised cells within it. When more of these cells have been cultured in the laboratory, they are painted onto a biodegradable bladder-shaped scaffold which is warmed to body temperature. The cells then mature and multiply. Six to eight weeks later, the bladder is ready to be put into the patient.”
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The Economist

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Gentle reminders

ReflectOns: Mental Prostheses for Self-Reflection
“Certain tasks such as figuring out number of calories consumed, or amount spent eating out, are generally far more difficult for the human mind to grapple with. By using in-place sensing combined with gentle feedback and understanding of an individual’s goals, we can recognize behaviors and trends and provide a reflection of their own actions that is tailored to enable better understanding of repercussion of actions, and change their behaviors to better match their own goals.”
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fluid interfaces

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Flying pixels

Screens in Space
“Each helicopter is “a smart pixel,” we read. “Through precisely controlled movements, the helicopters perform elaborate and synchronized motions and form an elastic display surface for any desired scenario.” Emergency streetlights, future TV, avant-garde rural entertainment, and even acts of war.”
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BLDGBLOG

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Safer driving

Al Gore Joins Richard Branson in Backing GreenRoad
“The GreenRoad system looks simple from the outside: There’s a two-inch device on the dashboard that starts the day with a green light. If a driver brakes hard, swerves or turns recklessly, the light turns yellow. If the driver continues to drive erratically the light stays yellow. If it gets worse the light turns red. That’s it. But like a lot of apparently simple ideas, there’s a lot more going on under the hood.”
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Techcrunch

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Dynamic textbooks

Macmillan’s DynamicBooks Lets Professors Rewrite E-Textbooks
“In a kind of Wikipedia of textbooks, Macmillan, one of the five largest publishers of trade books and textbooks, is introducing software called DynamicBooks, which will allow college instructors to edit digital editions of textbooks and customize them for their individual classes. Professors will be able to reorganize or delete chapters; upload course syllabuses, notes, videos, pictures and graphs; and perhaps most notably, rewrite or delete individual paragraphs, equations or illustrations.”
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NYTimes.com

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Techno-Gardening

Click and Grow – growing plants via computer
“The Click & Grow system doesn’t use soil as a growing medium. Instead it relies on aeroponics – a growing system that grows the plants in an air or mist environment. All failed green thumbs need do is place a plant cartridge containing some seeds into the pot, fill the water tank and upload the proper growth program to the pot and the Click & Grow system will take care of the rest. Although basic models include notification lights to let growers when the water tank needs refilling, more expensive models will even free growers of this task by collecting water from the air.”
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Gizmag

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The power of anonymity

The Surreal World of Chatroulette
“The social Web site, created just three months ago by a 17-year-old Russian named Andrey Ternovskiy, drops you into an unnerving world where you are connected through webcams to a random, fathomless succession of strangers from across the globe. You see them, they see you. You talk to them, they talk to you. Or not. The site, which is gaining thousands of users a day and lately some news coverage, has a faddish feel, but those who study online vagaries see a glimpse into a surreal future, a turn in the direction of the Internet.”
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NYTimes.com

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LED beads

» dilight: luminous little beads
“japan-based dilight are lucky to be nominated with their bead-shaped LED lights installation. the self-claimed branding studio strung the LED beads along wires to create a display and invite the viewer to interact. an electronic current is passed through the wires, ‘which generates the lights when it is reconverted into energy by coils inside each bead’.”
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Matandme

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