Physical + digital

Sent through the post, plastic chips carry an online message
“Chicago-based Life Tokens, which lets consumers express their emotions via coded tokens that are sent anonymously through the mail, and that link to personal online messages. Each token features a graphic on the front that encapsulates a specific emotion, and a 6-digit code on the back that, when entered by the recipient on Life Tokens’ website, reveals the identity of the sender along with a personal message. Life Tokens sent within the United States are priced at USD 5 which includes domestic shipping. International shipping is also available.”
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Springwise

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The internet of things

How to Add Anything to the Internet of Things: Creating the Geography of Everything
“Every object in existence can be tagged with any media, linked to tell a story, to recount its memories in a read/write environment and tweet when its interacted with. Its a concept that takes a bit of time to take in, for example a wall in Camden Town, London, tweeted me last week when someone replayed its memories of having a Banksy painted on it. That wall is part of the Internet of Things via the project TalesofThings.”
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Digital Urban

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Subtle humour

Training Computers To Detect Sarcasm
“A new algorithm that can recognize sarcasm may help improve the subtler aspects of human-computer interactions.  An Israli research team built the algorithm by scanning 66,000 Amazon reviews and manually tagging sentences which contained instances of sarcasm. After identifying patterns, and classifying them into different sarcastic classes, the group set out to train the computer”
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PSFK

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Light network

LED Lights Able To Stream Video At 2Mbps Thanks To Chinese Research
“What does this mean? Well, it’s obviously another option for sending and receiving data, but could prove ultra-interesting when your internet connection doubles up as your home lighting too. It would be a short-range network for connecting your home system, and while I doubt it’ll replace your current set-up it could certainly help take some strain off it”
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Gizmodo

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Trying things on

Augmented Reality App Lets You Try On Watches While Still In Pajamas
“We’ve seen concept videos for apps that let us try on watches, but now we’ve finally got something we can actually play with. Now we can try on watches without ever having to put on pants and leave the house. Just download this hefty 82MB app, print a goofy paper watch, and wave your hand in front of a webcam for your very own virtual fashion show”
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Gizmodo

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The evolution of twitter

A Big Bang called Twitter
“Concentric circles representing the years since the birth of Twitter work as the underlying refence system. The sphere is divided in topical sections to group users from different fields. The topics are Technology (unsurprizingly the biggest group), News, Journalism, Business, Politics, Humor, Sport, Music, Entertainement, Intelectuals and Art & Design. Each Username is displayed with additional data like List Rank, List Volume, Follower Volume or First Tweet (See image below for the full description).” image
Datavisualization.ch

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Small robots

Scientific team creates molecular robot from DNA
“Scientists from Columbia University, Arizona State University, the University of Michigan, and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have created a robot that’s just 4 nanometers wide. And no, it doesn’t have flashing lights, video cameras or wheels. It does, however, have four legs, and the ability to start, move, turn, and stop. Descendants of the molecular nanobot, or “spider,” could someday be used to treat diseases such as cancer or diabetes.”
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Gizmag

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Bigger disks

New Technology Could Massively Increase The Storage Capacity Of Hard Disks
“Each of the two write methods deals with the issue of writing pieces of data very close together without affecting the bits around it. One of the methods, thermally-assisted magnetic recording (TAR), heats an area of a small-grain surface to write it, and then cools the surface once the writing is done. The other writing method, bit-patterned recording (BPR), writes to a surface that has “magnetic islands” lithographed in…Together, they form a writing system that can limit bits to tiny areas on inexpensive surfaces, and don’t affect surrounding data bits.”
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PSFK

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