Mobile x-ray

These Vans Can See You Naked With Their Full-Body Scanners
“The Z Backscatter Vans, or ZBVs, as the company calls them, bounce a narrow stream of x-rays off and through nearby objects, and read which ones come back. Absorbed rays indicate dense material such as steel. Scattered rays indicate less-dense objects that can include explosives, drugs, or human bodies. That capability makes them powerful tools for security, law enforcement, and border control.”
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Gizmodo

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Texting without looking

guuste hilte: tactile texting
“the design can be used by the visually impaired or by anyone looking to text without necessarily seeing the keypad or screen.  the small device has a simple white case that is scored with small indentations that allow users to feel their way around, hitting the keys they need. the project is currently a sand alone device that would wirelessly communicate with a mobile, but hilte hopes to see the idea integrated into mobiles in the future.”
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Design Boom

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Display resolution

New Nanotech Display Has Pixels Eight Times Smaller Than iPhone 4′s
“Extremely tiny slits cut into very thin metal layers allow different parts of the light spectrum though, with the gaps between the cuts—ranging between 25 and 360 nanometers apart—displaying the red, blue and green light that makes our popular TV shows and internet content come to life. The new technology also does away with the need for the polarizer layer found in today’s screens, making this potentially cheaper to produce.”
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Gizmodo

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Car computing

In-car computing for the luxury set
“That’s the interior of the iBusiness, a bespoke Mercedes S-Class by aftermarket company Brabus. As you can see it’s been tricked out with dual iPads, headrest monitors and a freaking fifth screen that folds out of the ceiling. The iPads control the car’s audio and telephone systems, in addition to the navigation, though that latter feature doesn’t make much sense. There’s a Magic Mouse on the armrest, Bluetooth headsets next to each monitor, and hidden away are a 64 GB iPod and a Mac Mini in the trunk connecting the whole operation.”
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Core77

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New forms of electricity

Harnessing Electricity From Air
“’Using small particles of aluminum phosphate and silica — two particles found commonly in the atmosphere — they showed that in the presence of water vapor silica particles become more negatively charged. Aluminum phosphate grows slightly more positively charged. This building of charges in humid air can accumulate and be transferred to other objects, explaining phenomena like the charge buildup where steam escapes from boilers that had baffled scientists for centuries.’ The team says their study would help in discovering ways to harness electricity right out of thin air to power buildings and to make panels that prevent lightning from striking.”
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PSFK

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Game control

Even a Non-Gamer Would Struggle to Resist the Mag Gun Controller
“The controller has a wide-angle camera in its tip, and to calibrate it, all you have to do it point it at the center of the TV. It then (if my analysis is correct) simply tracks the luminance image of the TV (it’s a distinctive rectangular shape, obviously) and uses that to determine where the gun is pointing. That’s very smart! It has all the same drawbacks and advantages of the Wiimote, which just uses IR instead of the TV’s visible spectrum.”
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Gizmodo

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Car updates

Using Wi-Fi, Your Ford Could Soon be as Customizable as Your Phone
“Now, Wi-Fi is being used for a new application in their Oakville, Ontario plant: to install phone and entertainment features in the production line of select vehicles. Loading the software this way has resulted in a less than 1% failure rate so far, and it has reduced labor costs since it’s hands-free. But what’s most interesting about this method of transmitting software is its potential for customization. By wirelessly programming cars, drivers could set details like how quickly the transmission shifts gears, choose power-seat preferences, or a hundred other little personalizations that would make your vehicle unique. Currently, they have a common programmable electronic component that would provide over 90 such options.”
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Gizmodo

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Storage density

New record set for ferroelectric data storage
“For most of us, storing and accessing the vast majority of our computer data involves using either hard disk or solid state drives or perhaps a combination of both. Each method boasts its own advantages and while the battle for storage supremacy between the two rages in public, research at Japan’s Tohoku University has revealed another option. Using a pulse generator to alter the electrical state of tiny dots on a ferroelectric medium, Kenkou Tanaka and Yasuo Cho have successfully recorded data at around eight times the density of currently available hard disk drives.”
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Gizmag

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