Simple wifi objects

The Q2 puts a new twist on Internet radio
“Once the cube’s li-ion battery – which is said to be good for at least eight hours of playback – is charged up and the unit turned on, listeners just need to tilt the front face upwards to increase volume and downwards to turn it down. The device connects to the existing wireless broadband network via built-in 802.11b/g Wi-Fi that’s WEP, WPA and WPA2 compatible. Changing stations is equally buttonless, as the cube is simply tipped over onto another side. This is achieved with a 3-axis accelerometer similar to that found in a Nintendo Wii games controller.”
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Gizmag

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Personal books

Book features lessons from fathers, including your own
“24×7 took an existing book and lets readers create a personalized copy. Aprendi com meu pai, or Learned from my Father, features lessons that 54 famous people learned from their fathers. Now, people can order a copy that features a lesson they learned from their own dad. Their story is added to the existing chapters, and their name is printed on the cover, as a co-author of the book.”
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Springwise

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Delivering during your day

City dwellers enlisted & rewarded for delivering DHL packages
“Interested participants indicate their travel route for the day using a downloadable smartphone app; a text message then lets them know of any packages needing delivery along the way. When there is such a package, the participant picks it up from the local kiosk where it’s waiting and delivers it as they go about their daily business. In exchange for their help, the program rewards them with points that can be redeemed for free train tickets, merchandise coupons or CO2 credits.”
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Springwise

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Facebook loyalty

Taggo Lets You Carry Facebook in Your Wallet
“Entrepreneur Aneace Haddad has created a service where you can link any kind of contactless payment card to various Facebook fan pages, instantly creating a kind of customer loyalty card. “Taggo,” short for tap-and-go, allows shoppers to register any card with a unique identity number in the online service, and then use the card to sign up as fans on retailers’ Facebook pages. They can then cash in on discounts and special sales, totally negating the need for any sort of paper coupons, or of carrying around four or five loyalty cards.”
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PSFK

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Online curating

Curated.by Aims To Be The “Smithsonian Of The Web”, But They Need Your Help
“Using an extension built for Google Chrome, Curated.by is able to augment twitter.com to add a new “Curate” button below each tweet. Clicking on this button allows you to add a tweet to any Curated.by bundle you’re in control of. […] These bundles can then be easily embedded elsewhere on the web, such as in a blog post, to give people an easy-to-follow overview of a topic. In this regard, Curated.by is similar to a company that launched at TechCrunch Disrupt in September, Storify. But a big part of Curated.by’s idea is also using algorithms to surface topics that you’re interested in. Or, to stick with the Smithsonian analogy, “an algorithm that shows you which painting people are going to stand in front of the longest at a museum,” Lehmann says. And the idea is to let multiple people collaborate on the same bundle to make it the most complete on any given topic.”
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TechCrunch

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Paper e-paper

E-Paper To Be As Disposable As Normal Paper?
“Professor Andrew Steckl, from the University of Cincinnati, successfully showed how electrowetting paper works in a similar manner to electrowetting glass. While e-paper is good for a few years at least (or however long it takes before you damage your Kindle), Steckl says this paper e-paper “is very cheap, very fast, full-color and at the end of the day or the end of the week, you could pitch it into the trash.”"
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Gizmodo

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Alternative currency

Hyper-Local Legal Tender
“In Western Massachusetts locals have created their own currency called Berkshares (named after the Berkshire Mountains) to help local retailers, restaurants and service people survive competition from national chains that were moving into small mountain towns. Thirteen bank branches, along with many businesses in the community, agreed to exchange dollars (100 Berkshares can be bought for $95, offering shoppers a 5% discount). Local artists designed the Berkshares as elegant bills, in denominations from one to fifty. Each bill shows the figure of a famous person from the region such as Norman Rockwell, Herman Melville, W.E.B. DuBois.”
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PSFK

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