Battle apps

Tracking The Taliban? Soldier Develops An App To Do Just That
“U.S. soldier, Captain Jonathan Springer, has contributed 26,000 dollars of his own money to launch an iPhone app for use in combat. Conceived by Springer, an artillery specialist stationed in eastern Afghanistan, Tactical Nav will help soldiers map, plot and photograph waypoints on a battleground as well as transmit coordinates to supporting units. The app’s main functions include a compass, camera and a gridded map that aids in accurately pinpointing exact locations down to a few feet. The information is then relayed to others soldiers linked into the app. Tactical Nav is also designed to be used to direct artillery fire or call in helicopter support for injured soldiers.”
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PSFK

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Sharing desktops

App turns desktop wallpaper into a changing photo collage
“To get started, users of Wallcast — which is now in beta — create an online account, upload at least five pictures and download the free desktop application. Wallcast then turns the user’s static desktop background into an array of photos that’s refreshed every three hours, or however often the user requests. Users can select a background image from among various options offered by Wallcast. Meanwhile, each Wallcast account gets a unique email address, so pictures can be added online, by email or via a separate iPhone app. Even friends and family can be invited to contribute photos to a user’s Wallcast account, and Wallcast will detect and display those new photos automatically.”
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Springwise

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Friends nearby

Proximeter: an ambient social navigation instrument
“Would you know if a dear, but seldom seen, friend happened to be on the same train as you? The proximeter is both an agent that tracks the past and future proximity of one’s social cloud, and an instrument that charts this in an ambient display. By reading existing calendar and social network feeds of others, and abstracting these into a glanceable pattern of paths, we hope to nuture within users a social proprioception and nudge them toward more face-to-face interactions when opportunities arise”
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Pasta&Vinegar

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Giving aid

New Initiative Harnesses Smartphones To Help Keep Heart Attack Victims Alive
“Here’s the gist of the app: you launch it, and it prompts you to ask if you’ve been trained in CPR and would be willing to help a stranger in the event of an emergency. If you accept this, then the application will take advantage of the iPhone’s location monitoring to get a general sense of where you are (a new feature enabled with the most recent update allows this with a minimal amount of battery drain). Then, the next time a 911 dispatch center receives a call for an emergency that’s occurring near you, you’ll receive a push notification telling you that help is needed. The app will also tell if you if an automated external defibrillator (those electric paddles that can kickstart a heart) is nearby.”
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TechCrunch

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Easy technology

Devices for Aging
“Doro’s phones are great for just making calls, and some models even have pictures of who to call instead of a dial pad, such as the Doro MemoryPlus corded phone pictured above. This model and most of the others (including the mobiles) are hearing aid compatible and feature large keypad buttons. Nominated for a Red Dot Award, the PhoneEasy mobile phone (pictured top right) also comes with security functions like pre-recorded SMS alerts, an automatic “man down” alarm and an easily-activated emergency dialing button.”
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Cool Hunting

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Sharing music

Listening Room Lets You Share Music in Real-Time Across the Web
“One person heads to Listening Room, creates a room with a name, then sends the link, or just the name, to anyone else they want to be listening. Click the record player, pick an MP3 from your system, and it starts playing as it uploads. Everyone else “in the room” hears the same track, too, at roughly the same time. You can chat about the track in the right-hand with your name attached, or post the link publicly and let folks jump in and heard you DJ”
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LifeHacker

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Storage like DRAM

Computer memory heralds green PCs
“The device developed by Dr Franzon’s team – known as a double floating-gate field effect transistor – stores data in the form of a charge, like non-volatile memory but uses a special control gate to enable the stored data to be accessed quickly. Today’s flash memory devices use a single floating gate to store an electric charge, which represents data. “We realised that a second gate would allow us to transfer charges really quickly,” said Dr Frazon. His team have shown they can transfer charges – in effect change the data – in around 15 nanoseconds. “That’s comparable with DRAM speeds,” he added. When in non-volatile mode, the data will be stored safely for a couple of years.”
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BBC News

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