Cellphone location

Cellphones Track Your Every Move, and You May Not Even Know
“Cellphone companies do not typically divulge how much information they collect, so Mr. Spitz went to court to find out exactly what his cellphone company, Deutsche Telekom, knew about his whereabouts. The results were astounding. In a six-month period — from Aug 31, 2009, to Feb. 28, 2010, Deutsche Telekom had recorded and saved his longitude and latitude coordinates more than 35,000 times. It traced him from a train on the way to Erlangen at the start through to that last night, when he was home in Berlin.”
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NYTimes.com

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Train power

T-Box Harnesses Wind Energy from Speeding Trains
“A passing train travelling at 200 kph would produce a wind speed equivalent to 15 m/sec. The T-Box would be able to catch this wind and produce about 3,500 W of power. If the train was 200m long, going at a speed of 300 kph and travelled 1km in 18 seconds, the T-Boxes would be able to produce about 2.6 KWh. This energy could then be utilized to power remote areas that don’t have electricity or rail sub-systems.”
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Inhabitat

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Websites from your phone

Zapd Creates Themed Websites Right From Your Phone
“Zapd is an iPhone app that lets you create a themed, well-designed, mobile-friendly website in 60 seconds. You pick a theme, snap a photo, add a caption, and if you want you can even write a little text (don’t strain yourself). When you publish the site or a new entry, you can share a short URL with your friends via Twitter, Facebook, or email. (You can also sign in with your Facebook ID). I tried it and it literally took me a few minutes to create these two sites, Seeking and The Truth.”
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TechCrunch

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Touch microscope

Multitouch gesture controlled microscope – the ‘iPad on steroids’
“Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM) have collaborated with Finnish company Multitouch Ltd to create a giant touch and gesture controlled microscope. The Multitouch microscope uses a combination of web based microscopy and a 46-inch multitouch display to create what researcher Dr Johan Lundin calls “an iPad on steroids.” A useful tool for interactive teaching and learning, the microscope allows users to zoom in or out with a two handed stretch or pinch gesture – all the way down to 1000x magnification.”
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Gizmag

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Robotic birds

SmartBird
“This bionic technology-bearer, which is inspired by the herring gull, can start, fly and land autonomously – with no additional drive mechanism. Its wings not only beat up and down, but also twist at specific angles. This is made possible by an active articulated torsional drive unit, which in combination with a complex control system attains an unprecedented level of efficiency in flight operation. Festo has thus succeeded for the first time in creating an energy-efficient technical adaptation of this model from nature.”
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Festo Festo Corporate

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Seeing in bad weather

Honeywell’s Augmented-Reality Display (Almost) Gives Pilots X-Ray Specs
“The live feed from an infrared camera in the nose of the plane — which can “see through” certain kinds of bad weather to reveal runway landing lights or other pertinent ground features — is perfectly registered via GPS on top of a 3-D graphical view of the terrain, creating a “blended image” that gives pilots “enhanced situational awareness in low visibility conditions,” says Bob Witwer of Honeywell’s Advanced Technology group. In English, that means they can see what they’re doing even when they can’t actually see what they’re doing. Think of it as something like X-ray vision, minus the titillating applications.”
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Co.Design

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Emergency wear

Bracelet features built-in GPS and security alarm system
“Designed by Oscar Magnuson and Efva Attling, and produced by Elcoteq, the jewelry appears at first glance to be little more than a bracelet consisting of 6 blocks. Inside the bracelet, however, is a GPS device which sends a tracking signal and an alarm to the wearer’s “shields” when the bracelet is pulled. With the Basic service these “shields” will be the wearer’s three most trusted friends, who can then call the wearer to check whether they are in danger. If the wearer does not pick up, these friends can track them using the PFO app on their smartphone or notebook. Alternatively, with the Premium service, pulling the bracelet will send an alarm to the security company G4S.”
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Springwise

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