Finger tracking

amenbo 5-finger mouse
“‘amenbo’, a new input device by japan-based company double research and development, measures the movements and pressure of individual fingers, opening a range of expanded computing possibilities. kazumasa ueno, head of the company’s control systems group, notes that ‘amenbo’ differs from kinect and other 3D image recognition systems in its ability to sense finger pressure. one sensor is located in each of the five panels, so unlike a touchscreen, the device recognizes each finger as being part of a single hand, and can track movement information even when individual fingers are lifted off the surface.”
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DesignBoom

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Internet devices

Rymble brings social media into the physical world
“In the words of the team behind the device, “(Rymble) is a “social compass” that, instead of pointing to the north, moves in different directions as news and alerts happen in the user’s social network, in the web page of a company, artist, sports team or any other subject.” Initially just supporting Facebook, with Twitter to follow, the device connects to the Internet via Wi-Fi. Rymble will change shape, light up in different colours and make noises based of social activity on the Facebook account or page that it’s hooked up to.”
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TheNextWeb

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Local and online

LaCie CloudBox hard drive automatically performs backups to the cloud
“The CloudBox device itself has a 100GB of memory, but the package also includes the same amount of storage in the cloud – depending on your needs, that might or might not be enough. Once a day, everything that is saved to the device is automatically backed up online to a secure server. Of course, it’s already possible to access one’s hard drive via the internet. The big advantage of the CloudBox is that everything will be doubly protected. If the hard drive is lost or damaged, or if you’re not near it, your data can still be retrieved from the cloud. If you don’t have good internet access, or simply don’t want to wait through long upload/download times, you can use the hard drive.”
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Gizmag

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Resume graphs

Infographic Of The Day: Vizualize.me Instantly Turns Your Resume Into Charts
"Its algorithms and templates take your boring, vanilla C.V. and automagically transform it into a Feltron-esque personal infographic at the push of a button. "In the age of data overload, the text resume is slowly becoming a living anachronism," the company’s press release intones ominously. "The average resume is now over 2 pages long with more than 1000 words." Who wants to deal with that?"
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Co.Design

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Twitter commentary

Researchers Turn Twitter Into Real-Time Sports Commentator
"It turns out that with the right kind of filtering, Twitter can provide a remarkably accurate commentary, accurate to within a few seconds. Zhao and co say that on average tweeters take 17 seconds to report a game event.  Curiously, their system worked well on all the football games they monitored, except one: the Super Bowl itself.  That’s because the sheer number of tweets about this game seemed to saturate Twitter’s ability to distribute them. So Zhao and co were unable to see increases in the rate at which keywords appeared. Other than that, these guys seemed to have hit upon a great way to create real time commentaries. "Most of the techniques can be readily applied to many other sports games," they say. Although these games would require a similarly sized fan base. Soccer and baseball are obvious candidates and an automated sports commentary start up can’t be far behind."
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Technology Review

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Sharing displays

Oblong Has Built The Future Of Computing. I’ve Seen It. Used It. It’s Beautiful.
"The idea for Mezzanine is to get people in a room together in order to synthesize information in the most collaborative way imaginable. “We want to get everyone’s pixels in a shared workspace, where they collide,” Kramer says. “The key is to give everyone control over what’s happening,” he continues. And that means interacting with the data on the three main screens from your laptop, iPhone, iPad, directly on the screen with the wands, or even remotely via a device with a web browser. Using these controls, anyone can rearrange data, push new data into the flow, highlight specific things, and queue stuff up to talk about later. Perhaps the best way to think about it is as a symphony of information that everyone in the room can conduct. Again, it’s a bit hard to describe, but when you see it, it just makes sense."
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TechCrunch

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Spending less

Merry Miser: The Antidote to Impulse Spending
"Let’s say that you frequently shop at a local clothing store. Every time you walk near the store, your Merry Miser, which knows exactly where you are from the GPS in the smart phone, will buzz and send you a text message reminding you how much money you have spent in that shop in the past and the amount of your average purchase. It will also remind you that when you were asked a few days after the purchases how you felt about them, they had quickly lost their luster for you. In fact, Merry Miser will remind you that you gave the overall shopping experience at that store a lukewarm rating, and when asked how you felt about your purchase a full month later, you admitted it was still hanging somewhere in the back of your closet, with the tags still on. Then, in case you didn’t get the picture, Merry Miser will inform you that your "happiness" rating for shopping at this store is LOW. If that isn’t enough to make you resist that sweater in the window display, Merry Miser will show you a simple visual image depicting the current state of your finances relative to your goals. And finally, just to be sure you remember the value of being thrifty, it will show you a poignant and motivational quote, like this one from Bertrand Russell: "To be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness.""
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Gizmodo

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Card payment

Card.io’s SDK Makes Entering Credit Card Information As Easy As Taking A Snapshot
"Card.io is a new startup making its public debut today that’s looking to make lives easier for developers and users alike — by making inputting your credit card information as easy as holding your card in front of your phone’s camera for a few seconds. You can see the feature in action in the video below — the app recognizes the card, uses server-side OCR to scan it, then gives back the results in a couple of sconds. Better yet, it’s releasing the technology as an SDK to mobile developers, so that they can bake it into their own application."
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TechCrunch

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