Making physical

Representing Long-Distance SMS Messages as Paper Planes
"SMS to Paper Airplanes [christiangross.info] presents a quite charming way of showing the message exchange in a long-distance relationship: each text message exchanged by the couple is translated into a unique paper plane, of which the physical dimensions depend on the content, style, and length of the actual message. Together, the planes form a physical exhibit, representing 369 messages between the author and his partner between September 2010 until April 2011."
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information aesthetics

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See-through batteries

Transparent lithium-ion batteries make sci-fi gadgets a reality
"The batteries are created by first etching very narrow channels, in a grid pattern, into a silicon wafer using standard lithographic processes. Liquid PDMS (a transparent silicone polymer) is then poured over the silicon wafer mold and cured. The electrode chemicals are dripped into the molded narrow channels and capillary action draws the chemicals into long, thin ridges. One piece of polymer is covered in positive electrodes and the other is covered in negative electrodes, and they’re perfectly aligned so that light passes through the gaps in the grids. The package is then filled with a clear gel electrolyte, wires are attached, and voila: a transparent battery!"
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ExtremeTech

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Cooling computing

Secondary Growth: A Computer Plant Hybrid
“The Israeli designer Omer Deutsch created the Secondary Growth, a computer cooled by the water and soil needed to grow an ivy plant. Combination of electronics and Mother Nature Omer manages to provide homes and offices with a touch of nature. Giving a new meaning to ‘hybrid’ Secondary Growth imagines a computer cooled by the water and soil needed to grow a plant that the user prefer. The soil and moisture from the plant keeps the hard drive from overheating and the computer serves as a pot for the plant. ”
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Gizfactory

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Blood monitoring

Tattoo Tracks Sodium and Glucose via an iPhone
“Using a nanosensor “tattoo” and a modified iPhone, cyclists could closely monitor sodium levels to prevent dehydration, and anemic patients could track their blood oxygen levels. […] The team begins by injecting a solution containing carefully chosen nanoparticles into the skin. This leaves no visible mark, but the nanoparticles will fluoresce when exposed to a target molecule, such as sodium or glucose. A modified iPhone then tracks changes in the level of fluorescence, which indicates the amount of sodium or glucose present.”
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Technology Review

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Graphics tech

Intel details new high-speed CPU-powered anti-aliasing
“Instead of rendering a larger image and downsizing, MLAA is basically a filter that is applied to every frame created by the game or application. In a similar way to the depixelizing pixel art algorithm, MLAA blends edge pixels with their surrounding areas. To do this, the MLAA algorithm looks for Z- and U-shaped edges, and then breaks them down into L-shapes, blending the pixels between the resultant L shapes.”
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ExtremeTech

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Window interactions

Toyota Imagines What It Could Be Like In The Backseat
“Toyota Europe has launched a concept video that imagines the back seat window in a car as a touch screen that interacts with passing scenery. The video shows a young girl looking out of a back seat window during a drive out to the country. She suddenly starts to draw and trace objects on the window with her finger. She’s also able to zoom in on distant subjects and tap the screen to hear a voice that tells her what she’s pointing at, much like a parent would do for a child while reading a picture book.”
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PSFK

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Learning guitar

iPerform3D online guitar lessons with an all-round twist
“Around 100 motion sensors and cameras capture the full performance from all angles and the information is used to create a virtual 3D model of a guitar instructor. The result has the look and feel – and doubtless a similar addictive quality – of popular console games like Guitar Hero, but offers users the chance to actually learn to play a real instrument. It’s said to put the user in total control of the learning environment – a student can slow down the sequence while keeping the pitch, adjust the camera angle to whatever suits best (from a player’s eye view to dropping behind and looking through the neck of the guitar), zooming back and forth from the onscreen avatar, and looping bite-sized sections before moving on and nailing the next segment.”
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Gizmag

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Sharing vacations

With RFID wristbands, park guests instantly share photos on Facebook
“Guests at Great Wolf Lodge resorts already use RFID wristbands as room keys and in-house charge accounts. Now, beginning at the chain’s property in Grand Mound, Washington, its new Great Wolf Connect service allows guests to register their wristbands at a dedicated kiosk and link them directly to their Facebook account as well. Then, when they stop to pose for a photo at any of the park’s five camera-equipped “Paw Posts,” guests simply scan their wristband and their photo can be automatically posted to their Facebook wall. Launched in late June, the Great Wolf Connect service was built by Fish Technologies.”
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Springwise

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Glass computing (concept)

Future Computer by Jakub Záhoř
“This concept computer-of-the-future by designer Jakub Záhoř allows the user to operate the device anywhere they can find a glass surface. The user simply attaches the central unit to any glass surface like a window or coffee table, switches on the power, and watches their system light up before their eyes. The display appears as an interactive hologram on the glass that the user merely has to touch to operate. It also makes for an easy, take-anywhere way to project photos and presentations or stream movies. Windex not included.”
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Yanko Design

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Air guitar

Air guitarists rejoice and make some noise with Air Picks
“Rather than just play the tune for you when you switch it on, the Air Pick requires a flick of the wrist to produce a guitar note from the device’s tiny speaker. Each song has a specific rhythm made up of long and short notes, so you’ll have to really strut your air guitar stuff and get your timing right if you don’t want to look and sound like a complete fool. Near the speaker vent at the back is a button to add some whammy bar wobble to your riff, and a screw to open the battery compartment to swap out fading AG13 cell batteries so that the music can go on and on. Each Air Pick also includes a carabiner clip to help with transport between performances.”
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Gizmag

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