Tablet play | Disney Appmates uses real figures on the iPad screen

Disney’s Appmates Turn The iPad Into An Interactive Playmat
"By gently pressing the figure down on the screen, the corresponding app essentially turns the iPad into an interactive playmat. Since the iPad can differentiate between characters, players will hear different bits of narration and dialogue depending on the figure they’re using. The app itself takes a sandbox approach to the Cars world: players can engage in races with other characters, complete missions to pick up some virtual cash, or just tool around scenic Radiator Springs. It’s an incredibly cool concept, and one that you can believe Disney will milk in coming months. "
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TechCrunch

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Brain interfaces | Computers replacing lost brain function

Scientists Can Now Extract, Record and Return Information To the Brain
"A Tel Aviv University team lead by Professor Matti Mintz have developed a synthetic cerebellum that can receive sensory inputs from the brain, analyze them, and return information to other parts of the brain! The device is now working in rats, and has effectively restored lost brain functions caused by damaged tissue. However, the most important thing is that this proves that brain-to-machine communication can work in a bi-directional way, with a machine getting information from the brain, analyzing it and then talking back to the brain."
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Gizmodo

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Personal memory | NASA develops woven memory textile

Wearable electronics: NASA develops memory-storing e-textile material
"The total capacity of copper/platinum/copper oxide resistive memory is defined by the number of intersections, so in the image above, the piece of memory being held between two (rather luminous) fingers would store just 28 bits of data. In this case, though, the researchers used copper wire that is 1 millimeter thick — but there’s no reason that it couldn’t be scaled down to just a few nanometers… and in that case, the capacity of an e-garment could be measured in gigabytes or terabytes."
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ExtremeTech

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Medical assistance | Panasonic hospital assistance robot

HOSPI-Rimo: Meet Panasonic’s Cute Assistance Robot
"Panasonic Japan announced [press release in English] the development of the so-called HOSPI-Rimo yesterday, a cute “Communication Assistance Robot” specifically designed for medical use. HOSPI-Rimo (Remote Intelligence and Mobility) is supposed to make it easier for bedridden patients to get in touch with doctors or family members living far away (“virtual visits”)."
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TechCrunch

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Navigation | Crowd-sourced traffic signal data

Dynamic traffic management with iPhone
"SignalGuru is designed to detect traffic lights and track their status as red, amber or green. It broadcasts this information to other phones in the area that are fitted with the same software, and—if there are enough of them—the phones thus each know the status of most of the lights around town. Using this information, SignalGuru is able to calculate the traffic-light schedule for the region and suggest the speed at which a driver should travel in order to avoid running into red lights.”"
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Are we nearly there yet?

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Augmented reality | Fitting molecules together

Chemistry of the future: 3D models and augmented reality
"Olson’s lab prints 3D models of molecular structures, both targets—like the HIV protease enzyme in the video—and the drugs they’ve made to bond to those targets. The models are rigged up so that when Olson holds them in front of a webcam, they instantly interact with chemical analysis software his team has built. The result is a system that allows researchers to see, physically, how well the drugs fit their targets, and simultaneously test how well the two are likely to bond on a chemical level."
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Boing Boing

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Gaming | Wii-based physiotherapy

Wii-based platform could help stroke victims recover at home
"While standard Wii games tend to be too difficult for recovering stroke patients, the WeHab system incorporates a number of features that make it better suited for therapeutic use. Within the hospital, therapists can use the system’s Nintendo Wii balance boards and web cameras to lead patients through customized rehabilitation exercises and feed the results into an accompanying software program, according to a Fast Company report. There data are logged, analyzed and visualized on a large monitor so that patients can see their own progress and adjust their posture accordingly."
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Springwise

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Fashion | Snapette allows you to share and track fashion trends

Fashion app to recommend and locate trending items
"Users take photos of their favorite bags, shoes and accessories and post them to Snapette, along with comments and where they found them. Users can then search by brand, store, description and by what’s new, near or trending, as well as comment on photos, share tips and recommendations. Each user has a “virtual closet” on their profile page that displays photos of items they’ve posted, like and want, with the option share posts on Facebook and Tumblr. Snapette has also partnered with boutiques in New York City, Los Angeles, San Francisco and London, and provides an exclusive view of these stores’ product offerings, under the a separate section on the app titled “Collections”."
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Springwise

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Random generators | Virtual monkeys re-creating Shakespeare

Virtual monkeys write Shakespeare
"Mr Anderson’s virtual monkeys are small computer programs uploaded to Amazon servers. These coded apes regularly pump out random sequences of text. Each sequence is nine characters long and each is checked to see if that string of characters appears anywhere in the works of Shakespeare. If not, it is discarded. If it does match then progress has been made towards re-creating the works of the Bard. […] A running total of how well they are doing shows that the re-creation is 99.990% complete."
BBC News

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