Data storage | 1s and 0s stored using silicon physically bent by light

Yale Stores Data Mechanically—with Frickin’ Lasers
"The device is essentially a tiny piece of silicon that can be bent up or down by the light propagating inside a photonic circuit. Once the light is switched off, the piece remains in one of those states, representing the 1s and 0s of digital coding. The engineers from Yale who developed the device, which is called a "nanomechanical resonator," described it yesterday in the journal Nature Nanotechnology."
image
via Gizmodo

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Biometrics | Clothing store body scanner for the perfect fit

Clothing Store Body Scanners Know Your Every Curve
"Recently installed at the New Look store in London’s Westfield Stratford mall, Bodymetrics’ scanning booth looks like a change room, but instead of mirrors inside you’ll find a set of eight PrimeSense 3D laser sensors. You’ll still need to strip down to your undies for it to produce an accurate reading, but as the lasers scan up and down your body they make a hundred different measurements which are then processed by the company’s body shape analytics to provide recommendations on what style and size of jeans will fit you the best."
image
via Gizmodo

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Robotics | Unpowered walking robot based on human gait

BlueBiped: A human-like walking robot that requires no power source
"Without making this accomplishment any less awesome, these robot legs — called BlueBiped, and made by researchers at the Nagoya Institute of Technology in Japan — are basically just an imitation of human physiology. There are thighs and lower legs made out of aluminium that are the same length as their human counterparts, and ankles and  knee joints for articulation, but… that’s it. No sensors, no computers, no “musculature” — the legs are completely passive, you just give them a push… and they carry on walking. As long as there’s a slight downwards slope, anyway — there has to be some source of energy, after all, and in this case it’s gravity."
image
via ExtremeTech

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Gaming | Really fun exercise with Zombies, Run!

Augmented Audio Game Spurs Fitness By Immersing Runners In Zombie Infested World
"Their game, Zombies, Run!, is a soon to debut augmented audio running game for the iPhone, iPod Touch and Android that challenges users to rebuild civilization after a zombie apocalypse by completing location-specific tasks while running in the real world. Users cue the app and don headphones to collect medicine, ammo, batteries, and spare parts which can be used to build up and expand their base — all while getting orders, clues, and a story through their headphones. Missions last around 20-30 minutes and can be played in any city. The platform additionally records the distance, time, pace, and calories burned during all runs, and may soon include RunKeeper integration"
image
via @PSFK

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Digital video | Popcorn.js allows HTML to be driven by video playback

Popcorn.js Lets Web Filmmakers Fuse Video With Interactive Design
"…Mozilla created Popcorn.js, an "HTML5 Media Framework" for fusing online video with imaginative web design. But this isn’t merely wallpaper to hang around a Vimeo window: Popcorn uses Javascript to link real-time data visualizations, social media, and supplemental media to the video playback. This online documentary used Popcorn to synchronize clickable footnotes and other factual extras alongside the video playback:"
image
via Co. Design

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Body tracking | Face projection masks

daito manabe and zachary liberman: face projection
"tokyo-based artist daito manabe and zachary liberman created ‘face projection’, an artistic digital comprehension of the human face and expression. ‘face projection’ is an experimentation with the real time generic non-rigid face alignment system, facetracker, and requires no operator training. the artists employed the entirely intuitive program, coded in C/C++ API, as the base for registration of facial structure and expressions. the non-rigid computer vision tracks facial realignment in real time. the ‘face projection’ depicts the facetracker program registering one’s face, then analyzing the composition with algorithms. manabe and liberman were able to build upon this platform, elaborating the program in such a way that slightly altered the focus of facial shapes and patterning highlighted through the interaction"
image
via Design Boom

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Learning | Learn to cook with smart utensils

Motion-sensing kitchen teaches French to student cooks
"To use the system, users first access a connected computer, on which they select the recipe they want to prepare. As the instructions are given, digital sensors in the utensils, ingredient containers and other equipment register whether or not those instructions are being followed correctly. Those instructions are worded in such a way that they contribute to the student’s understanding of French in general. If the student makes a mistake, the computer verbally notifies them. They can also hear an instruction over again, or hear it in English, by accessing controls on the computer’s touchscreen."
image
via Gizmag

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Robots | Groundbot surveillance robot sees in 3D

Rotundus GroundBot spherical surveillance robot broadcasts live in 3D
"Controlled remotely or via a programmed autonomous GPS-based system, Groundbot can be equipped with wide-angled cameras (for 360-degree vision), night vision (IR) cameras, microphone and loudspeakers, as well as sensors for radioactivity, gas, humidity, fire, heat, smoke, biological material, explosives, or narcotics. GroundBot has all its sensors and cameras well-protected inside the hermetically sealed sphere, which means no sand, mud, water, or even gas can get inside. This makes it well-suited for uses such as investigating suspected gas leaks. It also withstands overturns, drops and knocks."
image
via Gizmag

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Energy | Thermostat learns your patterns of use

Thermostat Automagically Learns Your Heating Habits
"Instead of those damn up and down buttons, the Nest employs a dial to adjust your home’s temperature. The unit displays the current temperature and glows red if the heater is enabled and blue if the A/C is keeping you from sticking to your chair. After a week of spinning the household-temperature dial, the Nest actually learns your schedule and begins to set the temperature on its own."
image
via Gizmodo

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Robotics | Compressible, touch-sensitive gel skin

Robots Will Soon Get Touch-Sensitive Skin
"Using carbon nanotubes, Stanford researchers have been able to create touch-sensitive, gooey skin for AI sensing, prosthetics, and touch-sensitive sex androids. The skin could give robots touch-sensitivity and allow patients to regain feeling in their artificial limbs. The tubes, when embedded into the plastic skin, act as tiny, compressible springs. These tubes can bend and squeeze as necessary, allowing you to measure the forces applied to almost any material, from “taffy”-like plastic to something like a rubber sponge."
image
TechCrunch

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook