Augmented Reality | Book of poetry read through a webcam

Augmented reality poetry book can only be read via webcam
"The Between Page and Screen poetry book has no text printed on its physical pages. Rather, each page is covered with a stark black and white geometric shape and a web address leading to the book’s website. To read the book, readers must visit that site and hold each page up in front of their webcam, one at a time. Using the reader’s webcam, the site then detects the black and white markers and displays corresponding textual animations mapped to the surface of the page. The animations move with the book, creating the digital equivalent of a pop-up book."
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via Springwise

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Nano-tech | Carbon nanotube outperforms silicon in tiny transistors

Smallest-Ever Nanotube Transistors Outperform Silicon
"For over a decade, researchers have promised that carbon nanotubes, with their superior electrical properties, would make for better transistors at ever-tinier sizes, but that claim hadn’t been tested in the lab at these extremes. Researchers at IBM who made the nanotube transistors say this is the first experimental evidence that any material is a viable potential replacement for silicon at a size smaller than 10 nanometers."
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via Technology Review

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Visibility | Plasmonic metamaterial can theoreticaly hide items in visible light

Researchers cloak free-standing 3D object using plasmonic metamaterials
"Now researchers at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) claim to have brought invisibility cloaks that operate at visible light frequencies one step closer by cloaking a three-dimensional object standing in free space with the use of plasmonic metamaterials. Although, like previous studies, the UT team was only able to cloak an object to microwaves, they claim the technique enabled by the use of plasmonic metamaterials could, in principle, be applied to visible light. Additionally, unlike previous flat, "carpet cloaks" that had to be placed on top of the object being cloaked, the new plasmonic metamaterial-based technology can cloak an object positioned away from the cloak, in free space."
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via Gizmag

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Social Networks | Foursquare app shows at a glance status using arrivals board metaphor

Foursquare App Shows Check-Ins On A Mock Airport Arrivals Board
"‘Arrivals‘ is a Foursquare app styled after a classic airport arrivals board. Its clean and attractive design enhances a user’s experience of the social media platform by showing the location of friends without being too intrusive. The app is intended to be displayed on a spare second screen like a tablet or phone so you can see at a glance where your friends are."
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via @PSFK

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Archiving | Analogue movies last longer than digital with current tech

Digital Film Preservation
"According to the Academy, the total content associated with a single digital movie is well above three petabytes. (Each petabyte is a thousand terabytes or a million gigabytes). Cohen writes: "Digital storage, be it on hard drives, DVDs or solid state memory, simply isn’t on a par for anything close to the 100-plus-year lifespan of film. The life of digital media is measured in years, not decades, and file formats can go obsolete in months." "The best archiving solution today," says Cohen, "is to print out to film, ideally with a three-color separation printed onto black and white archival film. That’s a very expensive solution.""
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via Gurney Journey

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Tabletop Computing | Spotting whose feet are whose

Bootstrapper recognizes tabletop computer users by their shoes
"When a user interacts with the tabletop computer, the Bootstrapper system, which consists of one or more depth cameras mounted to the table’s edge, observes their shoes and matches them to a database of known shoe images that are associated with specific user profiles. When multiple users are interacting with the table at the same time, the system also takes into account the hand orientation of the touch inputs so they aren’t mismatched."
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via Gizmag

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Networks | Many industrial control systems are accessible online

Thousands of Industrial Systems Unwittingly Hooked Up to Internet
"Computers online tend to get hacked, of course, and you wouldn’t want your local power plant under rogue control. But a graduate student was able to locate and map more than 10,000 industrial control systems that are directly connected to the Internet, as reported by Kim Zetter at Wired’s Threat Level Blog. What’s more, only 17 percent of those devices bothered to ask for authorization to connect, suggesting that network managers simply didn’t realize that their control systems were online. The finding adds a discouraging twist to worries that hackers might take over critical infrastructure."
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via Scientific American

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