Printing touch-sensitive areas directly into 3D printed objects with “Carbomorph” [#3Dprinting]

“Carbomorph” material to enable 3D printing of custom personal electronics
"Researchers at the University of Warwick have created a cheap plastic composite that can be used even with low-end 3D printers, to produce custom-made electronic devices. The material, nicknamed "carbomorph," is both conductive and piezoresistive, meaning that both electronic tracks and touch-sensitive areas can now be easily embedded in 3D-printed objects without the need for complex procedures or expensive materials."
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via Gizmag

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Touchscreen shopping with Tesco’s 80” digital “Endless Aisle” [#shopping]

Tesco Introduces ‘Endless’ Virtual Toy Aisles
"[…] ‘endless aisles’ in the form of an 80 inch touchscreen catalog. The virutal mirror overlays augmented reality on a real mirror, allowing customers to see how clothing from the store would look on them. The ‘endless aisles’ feature the full range of toys available on tesco.com, allowing children and adults to use the giant touchscreen to browse over 11,000 products. They can filter by age, gender and price, read detailed descriptions and rotate some products to get a 360° view. Customers can place an order by printing a ticket for ‘Click and Collect,’ scanning the QR code with their smartphone, or sending a text to get a weblink."
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via PSFK

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Desk uses magnetism to guide a pen to draw a perfect circle [#drawing]

This Table Invisibly Guides Your Pen For Perfect Sketches
"Promising to turn even the poorest of doodlers into artificial Rembrandts, researchers at Keio University have developed a desk that will automatically guide the tip of a pen to draw straight lines or perfectly round circles. It can even guide an artists’ hand through a pre-determined illustration, making the technology sound like a forger’s dream come true."
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via Gizmodo

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“Wandant” pedometer for dogs lets you monitor their health [#petTech]

Fujitsu’s Wandant cloud-based pedometer for dogs launches in Japan
"Wandant uses a three-axis accelerometer to measure a dog’s steps and work out how much exercise the pooch in question is getting, while shivering and temperature changes are also duly noted. The resulting data can be transferred to PC or an Android smartphone via NFC chip and then uploaded to a cloud-integrated database. Owners may add additional information, including food volume, current weight, and details on the dog’s stool – all of which combined should give a better picture of the dog’s health. Interestingly, Fujitsu states that in the future, data collected will be shared with veterinarians and research institutions, and the company expects to expand the device’s features based on these findings."
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via Gizmag

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Cheaper thermoelectric materials for generating electricity from temperature differences [#power]

Scientists create inexpensive new thermoelectric material
"The material was developed by a team from Michigan State University, led by Prof. Donald Morelli. Although synthetic, its composition is based on that of a family of naturally-occurring and vastly-abundant minerals known as tetrahedrites. That composition has been tweaked just slightly, to make the finished product thermoelectric. The production process involves grinding “very common materials” into a powder, then using a combination of heat and pressure to compress them into the sizes needed."
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via Gizmag

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Gun doesn’t shoot until you are aiming at the target that you’ve tagged [#firearms]

Digitally targetted firearms
"A company called TrackingPoint is developing guns equipped with digital scopes that enable automated precision firing. Here’s how it works: you "tag" a target with the digital scope and then only when the gun is aimed directly at the target, it fires. Essentially, it lets you practice pulling the trigger any number of times before the gun actually shoots the target perfectly for you."
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via Kottke

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“Sunrise” redesigns the calendar to make it more useful [#calendar]

Ex-Foursquare Designers Focus On Sunrise, Want You To Do More With Your Calendar
"Thanks to attention to little details, the daily email is surprisingly useful. For example, with one tap, you can send an email to the person you are having lunch with — and it will prepopulate all the information as a reminder. LinkedIn job titles and profile pictures appear inline, much like Facebook profile pictures in email client Sparrow."
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via TechCrunch

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Luxo-like lamp that can see, hear and move [#robots]

Pinokio, The Animatronic Lamp That Is Aware of Its Environment
"Using Processing, Arduino, and OpenCV, the Lamp is given an ability to be aware of its environment, and to expresses a dynamic range of behaviour. As it negotiates it’s world, we the human audience can see that Lamp shares many traits possessed by animals, generating a range of emotional sympathies. In the end we may ask: Is Lamp only a lamp? – a useful machine? Perhaps we should put the book aside and meet a new friend."
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via Creative Applications

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Location-based content doesn’t need to be TOO local [#location]

The Broadcastr Team Launches Its ‘Next Evolution’: Spun, A Local News App That Connects Content To Real-World Locations
"he said that while Broadcastr’s big selling point was the ability to consume content about your specific location (say, listening to something about the Brooklyn Bridge while you’re walking across that very bridge), only 7 percent of users actually listened to content located within 200 feet of them. However, 76 percent of users listened to content that was within a 50-mile radius. The team’s conclusion: People care about local content, but most of them aren’t going to change their behavior to find that content when they’re actually on-the-go."
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via TechCrunch

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