“Slice” keyboard uses circles to try and keep the fingers in one place on touchscreens [#input]

Slice Circular Keyboard for Android Tablets Offers Fast and Easy Touch Typing, if You Can Learn to Use It
"You input characters via six circles and keep your fingers on the screen whenever you’re typing. Slice was designed to offer a typing solution that would allow you to avoid looking at the screen to see which characters you’re hitting. Ultimately, this would result in faster typing because you just need to memorize the key locations. The obvious downside is, of course, that you have a steep learning curve. The keyboard itself isn’t intuitive and it’ll take a lot of time to get started. "
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via LifeHacker

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Digital magazine presents current events in a comic style [‘#publishing]

Pad ‘Zine Serves Up Current Events As Comics
"The preview issue, now available, includes five lushly illustrated stories, covering diverse current events topics, from water pollution in California to the psych rock scene in Zambia. Each is presented by its own author or authors, with a slightly different aesthetic style and its own unique sensibility. The effect is instantly noticeable. Whereas other magazines, even today, are bound by a sort of overarching voice, Symbolia can accommodate many voices and visual styles–to its great benefit."
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via Co.Design

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Musical instrument made by mixing and touching colored jelly [#digitalMusic]

NOISY JELLY
"With this noisy chemistry lab, the gamer will create his own jelly with water and a few grams of agar agar powder. After added different color, the mix is then pour in the molds. 10 min later, the jelly shape can then be placed on the game board,and by touching the shape, the gamer will activate different sounds. Technically, the game board is a capacitive sensor, and the variations of the shape and their salt concentration, the distance and the strength of the finger contact are detected and transform into an audio signal."
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via Vimeo

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Augmented reality touch surface created on a train window [#AR]

Change The Passing Scenery On This AR Train Window
"The project titled ‘Touch the Train Window’ was created by the Japanese audiovisual collective Salad (aka Particle at Rest). The project converts a train window into an augmented reality screen, which allows users to place objects as an overlay of the actual scenery and watch them go by as the train moves in real-time."
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via PSFK

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Camera accessory holds a smartphone over your lens to make young subjects look your way [#photography]

Look Lock dangles a phone over your camera … for young portrait subjects
"Tether Tools states that because the Look Lock attaches to a hot-shoe and holds a smartphone directly above the lens, it also has added the benefit of making it look like portrait subjects are staring down the barrel of your lens in the resulting snaps, in all but close-up wide angle shots."
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via Gizmag

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The fragmented market for global messaging apps [#communication]

The Reality Of The Global Messaging App Market: It’s Really Freaking Fragmented
"So what does this mean? Smartphone messaging is and will stay fragmented at least in the near-term. KakaoTalk and NHN Line have very strong networks in their home countries of South Korea and Japan. Tencent’s Pony Ma said in September that their chat app WeChat had doubled in six months to 200 million users and Facebook certainly isn’t going to China anytime soon. Is it possible that this could change in the long-term? Social networking on the desktop web started out very fragmented. StudiVZ held notable market share in Germany, Google’s Orkut did well in India and Brazil, VKontakte dominated in Russia, Mixi held strong in Japan and so on. One by one, they began to fall thanks to pressure from Facebook."
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via TechCrunch

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Bending light in a circle using synthetic magnetism [#optics]

Stanford researchers control light using synthetic magnetism
"The Stanford device was made from a silicon photonic crystal structured so that an electric current applied to the device tunes the photonic crystal to exert an effective magnetic force upon photons. The device sends photons in a circular motion around the synthetic magnetic field. As shown above, the researchers were able to alter the radius of a photon’s trajectory by varying the electrical current applied to the photonic crystal."
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via Gizmag

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