Panasonic’s Augmented Reality mirror tracks faces and recommends make-up [#Fashion]

Panasonic’s AR Make-Up Mirror Turned Me Into a Pussycat Doll
“Combining facial recognition technologies gathered from Panasonic’s Lumix camera line and commercial security products, the mirror is able to track and assess your face, and give cosmetic recommendations based on your look. It’ll then put a real-time overlay of your face onto the mirror, complete with all manner of blush-inducing eye-shadow and lipstick combinations. Paired with bespoke software, the camera can also spot lines and wrinkles on your face, and adjust its application appropriately, and even show you how the make-up will look under different lighting conditions.” via Gizmodo

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Virtual high-fives between strangers in Amsterdam and New York [#Remote]

Perfect Virtual High Five Wins Free Trip to Amsterdam
“For one day only as part of KLM’s World Deal Week campaign, two interactive screens with HD video feed and audio were placed over 3,600 miles apart in New York City and Amsterdam. The screens encouraged spontaneous interactions between people in the two cities as they worked together face-to-face to accomplish a simple-sounding task. Whoever could achieve the “perfect” high five with their counterpart across the Atlantic was rewarded with KLM tickets to the other city (either New York or Amsterdam, depending on their current location).” via PSFK

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

V.isit.s maps your trips by place and time with interactive maps [#Travel]

Visits: Mapping the Places you Have Visited – information aesthetics
“The timeline visualization goes beyond the classical pin representation, which tend to overlap and are relatively hard to read. Instead, the data is shown as ‘map-timelines’, a combination of maps with a timeline that convey location histories as sequences of maps: the bigger the map, the longer the stay. This way, the temporal sequence is clear, as the trip starts with the map on the left and continues towards the right.  A place slider allows the adjusting of the map granularity, reaching from street-level to country-level.” via information aesthetics

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Dyson releases robotic vacuum cleaner with tank-treads for navigating small bumps [#Robots]

Dyson Reveals Its All-Seeing Robot Vacuum, The 360 Eye
“The robot vision work for the Dyson 360 Eye is in part a result of its ongoing partnership with Imperial College London, as well as 16 years and $47 million in R&D work for the robot vacuum alone. Dyson says it has also conducted analysis on 1.5 billion images during the device’s testing, as well as running testing on tracks that analyzed the 360 Eye’s suspension and tracks across 342,000 bump strips and 670 miles to test for durability. Its tank-style treads give it an advantage over the competition, Dyson says, in terms of helping it navigate small obstacles.” via TechCrunch

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Adding gestures to a phone using 4 radio antennas [#Gesture]

How Scientists Made This Ordinary Phone a Touchless Interface
“Researchers at the University of Washington look a regular touchscreen phone and attached a circuit board with four small loop antennae. It’s bulkier than a sleek naked phone, for sure, but not much worse than some monstrosities that pass for phone cases. These antennae detect interference in the radio waves that phones uses to communicate with cell towers. “When the user moves their hand around the mobile phone,” write the authors, “their skin, muscle, and bones affect the character of the propagation path by absorbing or reflecting part of the signal.” By analyzing how each of the four antennae receive the signal, the phone can distinguish between taps in eight locations, four hover gestures, and swipes in two directions. ” via Gizmodo

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Amazon releases program for creating self-published kids chapter books [#Books]

Amazon Invites Children’s Book Authors To Kindle Direct Publishing, Rolls Out Kids’ Book Creator Software
“This tool will allow budding children’s book authors to create chapter books and illustrated children’s books that are able to take advantage of Kindle features like text pop-ups, explains Amazon in an announcement about the new services. After the book is finalized, authors can also use the tool to upload the book to KDP while also stipulating the category, age and grade range filters needed to get the book listed correctly.” via TechCrunch

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Projection system recognizes vegetables and suggests recipes [#Food]

Smart surface offers up recipes based on the ingredients placed upon it
“Using a camera located overhead, the system can identify objects that are placed onto it using complex image recognition algorithms. If a zucchini is placed onto the table, the system will confirm that it’s detected a new object, identify it, and project its name next to it. Created as a demonstration of the possibilities of image recognition, the platform enables users to place any number of different vegetables onto the surface. The system then checks a list of pre-programmed recipes that contain the ingredients on the table and filters the ones that feature the vegetables available.” via Springwise

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Mercedes-Benz radar system helps truck drivers with their blind-spots [#Driving]

Mercedes-Benz unveils Blind Spot Assist technology for trucks
“Importantly, the system also aids when changing lanes by alerting the driver by means of an optical signal if a moving object is present on the passenger side of the vehicle. Located in the A-pillar on the passenger side at eye level, a triangular LED lights-up if there is a possible hazard situation alongside the vehicle. If that hazard becomes a collision risk, the LED will flash red and a warning buzzer will sound.” via Gizmag

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Colour-picking digital pen for young kids [#Drawing]

Mozbii Is A Color-Picking Stylus Just For Kids
“To be sure, there are other color-picking styluses out there, but Mozbii has several features that makes it suitable for children as young as two. The stylus is shaped like a lollipop with a flexible neck. Its RGB color sensor is embedded on one side of the head, with a tiny color-picking button next to it. To use it, kids just need to press Mozbii’s head against an object, and that puts enough pressure on the button to activate it, which means that even toddlers, who have limited motor control, can use the stylus.” via TechCrunch

image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook Post to LinkedIn

Interesting new social and technological trends culled from the web by Richard Banks.